Exploring Kayaking Destinations Around Morro Bay, California

Morro Bay is a stunning coastal town located in Central California. Located just north of San Francisco, the city has miles of sandy beaches and crystal clear waters perfect for kayaking. The calm, protected waters of Morro Bay make it an excellent destination for kayaking, canoeing, and other water adventures. While kayaking in Morro Bay, you’ll also get a chance to see the migratory birds in some areas.

During your trip, you may see wildlife, including sea lions and otters, but be sure to keep your distance. These animals may look cute from a distance but can become quite aggressive if you get too close. The best way to protect yourself is to learn to stay on a kayak or paddleboard and paddle slowly and quietly.

In addition to kayaking, there are other reasons to visit Morro Bay. For one, it’s home to many sea lions. This means that kayaking enthusiasts can expect to see the mammals all over the Bay. Kayakers can even get up close to them by paddling to a sand bar. 

Another favorite spot for sea lions is a floating dock. While sea lions are the most common inhabitants, you’ll also likely see harbor seals. Although they are much smaller and less noisy than sea lions, harbor seals may poke their heads out of the water and say hi!

In this article, we’re going to share the 5 best kayaking destinations around Morro Bay, California. So let’s begin with the following questions;

The Best Time To Go Kayaking In Morro Bay

Morro Bay is known for its beautiful scenery, and kayaking is one of the best ways to take in all of the sights and sounds. Moreover, the weather in Morro Bay is mild year-round, which makes it a great place to kayak. In the summer, the temperatures are usually mild, and there’s plenty of sunshine.

In the fall and winter, the temperatures are typically mild too, but there’s usually a little more rain than the sun. And in the spring and fall, there’s generally less rain but more wind.

Furthermore, the best time to go kayaking in Morro Bay is typical during the morning or early evening when the water is calm. You can also kayak around Morro Rock or explore the coves and inlets along The Strand.

Exploring Kayaking Destinations Around Morro Bay, California

The 5 Best Kayaking Destinations in Morro Bay, California

Kayaking in Morro Bay is a great way to see the Bay from a different perspective and get a workout at the same time. There are many kayaking options available in Morro Bay, including long kayak tours, short kayak tours, and paddle board rentals. 

If you are looking for a leisurely kayak tour that will take you around the Bay, try the Morro Bay Kayaks Easy Tour. This tour is rated as one of the easiest kayaking tours in California, and it only takes about two hours to complete. 

If you are interested in exploring more of Morro Bay’s coastline, consider taking one of the more extended kayak tours. The longest tour takes approximately four hours to complete, and it includes stops at some of the Bay’s most iconic spots.

Here are 5 of the best kayaking destinations in Morro Bay:

Estuary

The Estuary in Morro Bay is a protected body of water that spans the southern end of the bay and includes the coastal towns of Los Osos and the Baywood area. Moreover, this area is home to an abundance of marine life and supports a diverse ecosystem. There are several tours available, from gentle Bay cruising to whale watching.

If you’re new to kayaking, don’t worry; the Bay is flat and protected, making it ideal for first-time paddlers! A kayak tour in Morro Bay will allow you to see the Estuary and its wildlife from a whole new perspective. Seals, sea lions, otters, and other marine animals are among the sights you’ll encounter while kayaking here. Many rental shops offer on-shore instruction for beginners and even those with more experience.

Heron Rookery

You’ve probably seen the great blue herons nesting along the coast of San Francisco. If you want to see the same thing for yourself, go to the Heron Rookery. This grove is one of the largest between San Francisco and Mexico and is home to great blue herons, double-crested cormorants, and egrets. You can observe them feeding their young or simply observe them flying overhead.

While you’re kayaking, be prepared for the occasional sighting of seals, especially the California grey whales and the endangered California sea otters. You can even get up close to these majestic creatures on the sand bar. If you’re kayaking, you can also spot harbor seals, which are much smaller than sea lions but are just as fascinating. You can even wave to one, and they’ll probably poke their whiskers out of the water and say hello!

Huntington Harbor

Huntington Harbor is a sheltered harbor in Morro Bay, where kayaking is an enjoyable and unique activity. The Bay is a tidal lagoon with 2300 acres of eelgrass beds, mudflats, and wetlands. furthermore, near the Bay are a number of tidal pools and the 581-foot volcanic plug, Morro Rock. Kayaking on the sandspit provides easy access and smoother water than in other kayaking destinations.

The harbor is located near Seal Beach and Huntington Beach. Built-in the 1960s, Huntington Harbor has five public beaches and five man-made islands. Although it’s not a wildlife viewing area, it is still an excellent place for kayaking. Rental kayaks are available at OEX Sunset Beach. There are also guided evening kayak tours in the harbor. The Bay is also a popular destination for surfing.

Laguna Beach

A trip to Laguna Beach in Morro Bay may be just what you are looking for if you are looking for a peaceful island retreat. This small island is home to a 581-foot volcanic plug, Morro Rock, and is a haven for wildlife. Above all, kayaking in the Bay is a relaxing experience, as the waters are smoother, and the trails are easier to navigate.

Crystal Cove State Park is a popular kayaking destination and a popular spot for snorkelers and divers. The area offers scenic shorelines, kayak rentals, and guided tours. You can explore the sheltered waters and watch the wildlife, and you can even enjoy the scenery while you’re paddling. You’ll never run out of things to do on this idyllic island!

However, if you’re new to kayaking, consider starting with one of these popular destinations and getting started with a lesson.

Boardwalk

If you’ve ever been to a beach town in California, you know there’s nothing like kayaking on a lake. And kayaking in Boardwalk is no exception. This tiny beach town is a great place to spend a sunny day with your friends or family. You’ll find plenty of great kayaking spots to choose from, and the Embarcadero waterfront street is a great place to launch your kayak. You can also go whale-watching or charter a yacht to get a closer look at the Bay.

The Bay is protected by a 4-mile-long sand spit. Kayaking on the Bay is a great way to enjoy the Bay’s waters and the sunset. Whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned kayaker, you’ll find a kayaking spot that suits your skill level. While the water in Morro Bay is cold, it’s still warm enough to enjoy a nice beer on the waterfront.

Top Kayak Rentals Near Morro Bay, California

A kayak rental in Morro Bay will allow you to get up close and personal with the local wildlife. Sea lions and harbor seals are frequent visitors of the Bay, and kayakers can get up close and personal while paddling near a sand bar or floating dock. Harbor seals are smaller and less vocal than sea lions, and you may even spot one poking its whiskers out of the water for a quick hello!

If you want to explore the water in style, a Morro Bay kayak rental may be a perfect choice. The city’s beaches are a popular destination for paddleboarding, kayaking, and surfing. While the water is cold in Morro Bay, you can rent wetsuits from Wavelengths Surf Shop. Jeremy paddled past dolphins for the first time. The best way to learn how to paddle? Check out this video.

A Kayak Shack

For more than 50 years, A Kayak Shack has been one of the top kayak rental spots in Morro Bay. They offer everything from single kayaks to tandems and canoes, paddleboards, and more. You can rent kayaks for an hour or even longer, depending on the weather. Kayaks are an excellent way to experience the beauty of the Bay, and they are available for rental on Estero Bay.

For those interested in exploring the area by kayak, A Kayak Shack is located at the Morro Bay State Park Marina. You’ll find them at the west end of the parking lot. From here, you can paddle into the Estuary and enjoy the wildlife. During low tide, it’s best to stay in the front of the Bay, where sandbars are few.

Kayak Shack is located on the Los Osos side of the Estuary, in the “back bay.” They rent kayaks for all levels, from kids to adults. You can join tours led by Central Coast Outdoors to explore the area’s sand dunes. You’ll find life jackets and bottled water at this spot. In addition to rental services, there are plenty of parking and public restrooms.

Rock Kayak

If you’re looking to rent a kayak in Morro Bay, California, you’ve come to the right place. From beginner kayaking to a full-blown stand-up paddling tour, there are plenty of options for kayak rentals in the area. These rentals can be convenient and easy to book – and the staff is always happy to help you get started. You can even get a kayak tour if you’re a group of friends or family members.

To rent a kayak, you’ll need to go to Rock Kayak Co., which is wheelchair accessible. The kayaks are wheelchair accessible, and they come with life preservers and paddles. The business also offers lessons for first-timers, wheelchair rentals, and tours. Whether you’re looking for a relaxing family outing or an active weekend activity, the staff at Rock Kayak is here to help you get the most out of your trip.

If you’re not comfortable renting your own kayak, you can find one at the Estero Inn, which is located right off the Embarcadero. This company offers free lessons and rents stand-up paddleboards and kayaks for $15 an hour. While you’re at it, you might want to rent an electric pontoon boat for $99/hour. The Estero Inn also rents fat-tire beach bikes for $20 an hour.

Other Adventures In Morro Bay, California

Morro Bay is an amazing destination for adventure lovers. From fishing to kayaking to hiking, there is something for everyone in this coastal community. With miles of trails and coastline to explore, visitors can find plenty of fun things to do without ever leaving town.

For those who want a little bit more challenge, there are plenty of hiking trails in and around Morro Bay. Some are easygoing strolls, while others lead through densely wooded areas with steep inclines and drops.

Fishing In Morro Bay

If you love to catch fish, you’ll want to try fishing in Morro Bay. The region’s marine life is rich and diverse, and you can try to land one of these oceanic monsters by heading offshore. Whether you prefer pier or shore fishing, you’ll find plenty of opportunities to catch tuna, swordfish, marlin, or different types of sharks. Fishing in Morro Bay can be a fun way to spend an afternoon, or you can try a fishing charter to get the whole family involved.

For land-based fishing, the best places to go include the beaches. While twilight is the best time to fish, anglers should look for irregularities in the breaking waves to find the best spots. Also, don’t forget to bring along a pair of binoculars to see the best places to catch fish. You can also use a Vessel Monitoring System to keep track of your catch.

If you’re into surfcasting, one of the best beaches in Morro Bay is Sand Spit. This area is low-traffic and offers expansive views of the bay and the ocean. Anglers can catch dink perch, surf perch, and jacksmelt here. Another great location for fishing in Morro Bay is Spooner’s Cove, a protected cove where you can fish from the shore. While Spooner’s Cove sees more beach goers than Sand Spit, it’s well worth it because it offers great conditions during high tide and sunrise.

 Kayak Fishing Regulations In Morro Bay

Kayaking in Morro Bay can be a really fun and rewarding experience, but there are a few things to keep in mind if you’re planning on fishing from your kayak.

The first rule is that you cannot kayak within 100 yards of any shoreline. This means that if you want to kayak out to sea, you’ll need to head out into the open ocean. The second regulation is that you cannot harvest any marine life within 100 yards of any shoreline or structure. This includes whales, dolphins, and seals. If you’re caught breaking these regulations, you could face fines or even imprisonment.

Birding

The Morro Bay estuary is home to a diverse community of birds. You can expect to see Eared Grebes, Snowy Egrets, Green Heron, and even the elusive Peregrine Falcon, which has its nest on the nearby Morro Rock. If birding isn’t your thing, try whale watching, too. It’s a perfect stop along your Highway One road trip.

The Estuary is part of a four-eight-thousand watershed that supports a number of wildlife species, including peregrine falcons and perching birds. Birdwatchers will be delighted to discover that Morro Bay is home to one of the highest concentrations of bird species in North America. Moreover, the Bay is home to many bird species, including shorebirds, migratory birds, and shorebirds. You may also see black brant geese, which migrate from Alaska to feed on Morro Bay’s eelgrass beds. Other birds of note are the brown pelicans and great blue herons.

If you love birding, you may want to check out the coastal towns in Morro Bay. The town itself is a popular tourist destination on the Central Coast. There are several beaches that face the Pacific, including Morro Rock and Morro Strand State Beach, which are both ocean-facing. If you prefer the sandier side, you can also paddle on a sheltered beach near Fairbanks Point.

Lastly, taking a kayaking trip in Morro Bay is a great way to take in the scenery and relax. It’s also a great activity to do with friends, as there are plenty of places to stop for a picnic lunch or drinks on the way. So whether you’re looking for a leisurely afternoon activity or something more challenging, kayaking in Morro Bay is definitely worth checking out!

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